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Telegram Abused By Raccoon Stealer

Raccoon Stealer spread roughly 185 files totaling 265 megabytes.

 

As per a post released by Avast Threat Labs this week, Raccoon Stealer, which was first identified in April 2019, has added the capacity to keep and update its own genuine C2 addresses on Telegram's infrastructure. According to researchers, this provides them with a "convenient and trustworthy" command center on the network which they can alter on the fly. 

The malware, which is thought to have been built and maintained by Russian-linked cybercriminals, is primarily a credential stealer, but it is also capable of a variety of other nefarious activities. Based on commands from its C2, it can collect not just passwords but also cookies, saved logins and input data from browsers, login credentials from email services and messengers, crypto wallet files, data from browser plug-ins and extensions, and arbitrary files. 

As per the reports, Buer Loader and GCleaner were used to distribute Raccoon. Experts suspect it is also being distributed in the guise of false game cheats, patches for cracked software (including Fortnite, Valorant, and NBA2K22 hacks and mods), or other applications, based on some samples. 

Given since Raccoon Stealer is for sale, the only limit to its distribution methods is the imagination of the end-users. Some samples are spread unpacked, while others are protected by malware packers like Themida. It is worth mentioning whether certain samples were packed by the same packer five times in a row.

Within Telegram, the newest version of Raccoon Stealer talks with C2: According to the post, there are four "crucial" parameters for its C2 communication which are hardcoded in every Raccoon Stealer sample. Details are as follows:
  • MAIN KEY, which has changed four times throughout the year;
  • Telegram gate URLs with channel names; 
  • BotID, a hexadecimal string that is always sent to the C2; 
  • TELEGRAM KEY, a decryption key for the Telegram Gate C2 address. 

The malware decrypts MAIN KEY, which it uses to decrypt Telegram gates URLs and BotID, before hijacking Telegram for its C2. According to Martyanov, the stealer then utilizes the Telegram gate to connect to its real C2 via a series of inquiries to eventually allow it to save and change actual C2 addresses utilizing the Telegram infrastructure. 

The stealer can also transmit malware by downloading and executing arbitrary files in response to an instruction from C2. Raccoon Stealer spread roughly 185 files totaling 265 megabytes, including downloaders, clipboard crypto stealers, and the WhiteBlackCrypt ransomware, according to Avast Threat Labs.
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