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Showing posts with label Botnets. Show all posts

Hacker Group Cranefly Develops ISS Method

The novel method of reading commands from seemingly innocent Internet Information Services (IIS) logs has been used to install backdoors and other tools by a recently leaked dropper. Cybersecurity experts at Symantec claimed an attacker is utilizing the malware known as Cranefly also known as UNC3524 to install Trojan. Danfuan, another undocumented malware, as well as other tools.

Mandiant reported that Cranefly mainly targeted the emails of individuals who specialized in corporate development, merger and acquisitions, and significant corporate transactions when it was originally founded in May. Mandiant claims that these attackers remained undetected on target networks for at least 18 months by using backdoors on equipment without support for security measures.

One of the main malware strains used by the gang is QUIETEXIT, a backdoor installed on network equipment like cloud services and wireless access point controllers that do not enable antivirus or endpoint monitoring. This allows the attacker to remain undetected for a long time.

Geppei and Danfuan augment Cranefly's arsenal of specialized cyber weapons, with Geppei serving as a dropper by collecting orders from IIS logs that look like normal web access requests delivered to a compromised host.

The most recent Symantec advisory now claims that UNC3524 used Hacktool-based backdoors in some instances. Multiple advanced persistent threat (APT) clusters use the open-source technology Regeorg.
Additionally, Symantec has cautioned that Cranefly is a 'pretty experienced' hacking group as evidenced by the adoption of a new method in conjunction with the bespoke tools and the measures made to conceal their activity.

On its alert and Protection Bulletins website, Symantec lists the indicators of compromise (IoC) for this attack. Polonium is another threat actor that usually focuses on gathering intelligence, and ESET recently saw Polonium utilizing seven different backdoor variants to snoop on Israeli firms.

Cranefly employs this sneaky method to keep a foothold on compromised servers and gather information covertly. As attackers can send commands through various channels, including proxy servers, VPNs, Tor, or online development environments, this method also aids in avoiding detection by investigators and law enforcement.

It is unclear how many systems have been compromised or how often the threat actors may have utilized this technique in ongoing operations.



Microsoft Alert a Major Click Fraud Scheme Targeting Gamers

Microsoft is keeping tabs on a widespread click fraud scheme that targets gamers and uses covertly installed browser extensions on hacked devices.

The act of exaggerating the number of clicks on pay-per-click advertisements that constitutes a fraudulent click. According to experts, botnets are responsible for approximately a third of the traffic created by advertising on ad networks. To safeguard their image and keep their clients happy, advertising platforms frequently use click fraud prevention techniques, such as the Google search engine. 

In a series of tweets over the weekend, Microsoft Security Intelligence stated that "attackers monetize clicks generated by a web node WebKit or malicious browser extension stealthily installed on devices."

The internet company clarified in a tweet that the initiative targets unaware people who click rogue advertising or comments on YouTube. 

By doing this, a fake game cheats ISO file will be downloaded, and when opened, it will install the threat actors' necessary browser node-webkit (NW.js) or browser extension. Microsoft also mentioned that they saw the actors using Apple Disk Image files, or DMG files, indicating that the campaign is a cross-platform endeavor. 

It's important to note that the ISO file contains hacks and cheats for the first-person shooter game Krunker. Cheats are software tools that provide users of a game with a distinct advantage over other players.

DMG files, which are Apple Disk Image files usually used to distribute software on macOS, are also employed in the attacks in place of ISO images, demonstrating that the threat actors are aiming their attacks at several operating systems.

The discovery is no longer shocking because threat actors frequently use gamers as fine targets in their efforts, especially those who are scrambling to locate free cheats online.

The prevalence of virus spreading through well-known game franchises was demonstrated earlier in September by a report from endpoint security provider and customer IT security software company Kaspersky. The most popular file was distributed via Minecraft, which had 131,005 users infected between July 2021 and June 2022. 



Small Businesses Remain Vulnerable, With Rising Cyberattacks

 

Small businesses are three times more likely than big corporations to fall prey to scammers in 2021. A single cyberattack's average loss has risen from $34,000 to just about $200,000. These businesses have had to deal with legal bills, compliance penalties, reputational harm, and client loss in addition to cash losses. Many small enterprises are unable to recover from these setbacks.

Kaspersky Lab researchers tracked the amount of Trojan-PSW (Password Stealing Ware) detections in 2022: 4,003,323 versus 3,029,903, up nearly a quarter from the same period in 2021. Trojan-PSW is malware that collects passwords and other account information, allowing attackers to gain access to a company's network and steal important information. Web malware has been particularly bad in Indonesia, the United States, Peru, and Egypt, with the number of incidents in these nations growing several times in the last year.

Several firms have adopted the Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP), a technology that allows computers on the same corporate network to be linked together and accessed remotely, even when employees are at home. However, because RDP is of particular interest to cybercriminals, if an attacker gains access to the corporate network through RDP, they can commit fraud on any of the company's PCs that have been linked. 

The general number of RDP attacks has fallen marginally, but not across the board. There were around 47.5 million attacks in the first trimester of 2021 in the United States, compared to 51 million in the same period in 2022. 

Advanced security services might include built-in training to keep IT professionals informed about the latest cyberthreats. Business owners can transform themselves into sought-after cybersecurity specialists by investing in training and education. 

These specialists will be able to understand how threats may affect their organization and change technological and organizational cybersecurity measures accordingly. Experts at Kaspersky recommend investing in an advanced security product that can perform incident analysis. 

These authorities can figure out where and how a leak happened, they will be better equipped to deal with any unwanted ramifications. Kaspersky Endpoint Security Cloud Pro is a new edition of Kaspersky Endpoint Security Cloud that includes advanced new features such as automated response options and an expanded range of security controls in a single solution. 

Along with all the more ground capabilities, Cobb, the security consultant, recommends that businesses invest in three extra protection measures: 
  • Data backup solution: This ensures that information that has been compromised or lost during a breach can be easily restored from a different place. 
  • Businesses may consider adopting encryption software to protect sensitive data such as employee records, client/customer information, and financial statements. 
  • Password-security software or two-step authentication: To limit the likelihood of password cracking, use these technologies with internal programs.

 Bangladesh Cyber Incident Response Team has Issued a Warning About Malware Attacks Around Eid

 

Officials have warned of a possible cyber-attack on Bangladesh's financial and other key institutions' computer systems during the Eid vacations. According to a statement issued by the Digital Security Agency, the affected authorities must install or update anti-DDOS hardware and software. 

Officials believe the warning was sent by the government's specialized cyber-threat agency as a global cyberwar erupts in the Russia-Ukraine conflict, with NATO assisting the latter with arms support. 

The Bangladesh Computer Council's e-Government Computer Incident Response Team (BGD e-GOV CIRT) also recommends all key information facilities' internal systems be checked and monitored.

Following the current conflict between Ukraine and Russia, Tarique M Barkatullah, director (operations) of the Digital Security Agency and project director of the BGD e-GOV CIRT, stated “hackers from both sides are using important information infrastructures of different countries to spread botnets and malware and attack each other.” 

Botnets are computer networks infected with malware (such as computer viruses, key loggers, and other malicious code or malware) and remotely controlled by criminals, either for monetary gain or to launch assaults on websites or networks. 

BGD e-Gov CIRT discovered over 1400 IP numbers used in Russia after analyzing the warning message issued by the Russian Computer Security Incident Response Team. According to the CIA, hackers are using these IPs to spread propaganda and launch distributed denial of service (DDoS) operations. 

Tareq M Barkatullah, project director of BGD e-Gov CIRT, remarked in this reference: “The country's afflicted financial institutions and public service suppliers are being hampered in providing its usual services due to the exploitation of these IP-enabled Bangladeshi servers."

According to the Financial Express, Prof Dr. Md Salim Uddin, chairman of the executive committee of Islami Bank Bangladesh Limited (IBBL), several financial institutions have been targeted by cyber-attacks as a result of the current crisis between Ukraine and Russia.

IBBL is well-prepared to thwart any cyber-attack because it is always adopting new technological solutions. Among the internal systems, he emphasized strengthening cyber-security with new tech solutions and monitoring systems. To prevent all types of cyber threats, financial institutions should join an organization or platform to improve cooperation and integration. He further urges the government to expand collaboration and support in this area in order to combat rising cyber-threats in the future.

Cloudflare Blocks a  DDoS Attack with 15 million Requests Per Second

 

On Wednesday, Cloudflare, an internet infrastructure company, revealed it has successfully resisted one of the largest volumetric distributed denials of service (DDoS) attacks ever seen. A DDoS attack with a pace of 15.3 million requests per second (rps) was discovered and handled earlier this month, making it one of the greatest HTTPS DDoS attacks ever. 

According to Cloudflare's Omer Yoachimik and Julien Desgats, "HTTPS DDoS assaults are more pricey of necessary computational resources due to the increased cost of establishing a secure TLS encrypted connection." "As a result, the attacker pays more to launch the assault, and the victim pays more to mitigate it. Traditional bandwidth DDoS assaults, in which attackers seek to exhaust and jam the victim's internet connection bandwidth, are different from volumetric DDoS attacks. Instead, attackers concentrate on sending as many spam HTTP requests as possible to a victim's server to consume valuable server CPU and RAM and prevent legitimate visitors from accessing targeted sites."

Cloudflare previously announced it mitigated the world's largest DDoS attack in August 2021, once it countered a 17.2 million HTTP requests per second (rps) attack, which the company described as nearly three times larger than any prior volumetric DDoS attack ever observed in the public domain. As per Cloudflare, the current attack was launched from a botnet including about 6,000 unique infected devices, with Indonesia accounting for 15% of the attack traffic, trailed by Russia, Brazil, India, Colombia, and the United States. 

"What's intriguing is the majority of the attacks came from data centers," Yoachimik and Desgats pointed out. "We're seeing a significant shift away from residential network Internet Service Providers (ISPs) and towards cloud compute ISPs." According to Cloudflare, the attack was directed at a "crypto launchpad," which is "used to showcase Decentralized Finance projects to potential investors." 

Amazon Web Services recorded the largest bandwidth DDoS assault ever at 2.3 terabytes per second (Tbps) in February 2020. In addition, cybersecurity firm Kaspersky reported this week about the number of DDoS attacks increased 4.5 times year over year in the first quarter of 2022, owing partly to Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

The Emotet Malware is Alive and Using TrickBot to Rebuild its Botnet

 

The malicious Emotet botnet, which made a comeback in November 2021 after a 10-month break, is showing indications of steady expansion once again, collecting a colony of over 100,000 infected hosts to carry out its destructive actions. 

In a new round of attacks, Emotet, a Banking Trojan which has evolved into a formidable modular threat, has reappeared with improved features. It has infected devices to carry out additional spam campaigns and install various payloads like the QakBot (Qbot) and Trickbot malware. These payloads would subsequently be utilized to give threat actors, such as Ryuk, Conti, ProLock, Egregor, and others, early access to deploy ransomware. 

"While Emotet has not yet reached the same magnitude as before, the botnet is displaying a strong resurrection with a total of around 130,000 unique bots scattered over 179 countries since November 2021," Lumen's Black Lotus Labs researchers wrote in a report. On April 25th, 2021, German law enforcement used the network to send an Emotet module that removed the malware from afflicted devices. 

The TrickBot malware has begun to dump an Emotet loader on affected devices, according to Emotet research group Cryptolaemus, GData, and Advanced Intel. While Emotet used to deploy TrickBot, the threat actors now use a mechanism called "Operation Reacharound" by the Cryptolaemus group, which rebuilds the botnet utilizing TrickBot's current infrastructure. 

Apart from command-and-control (C2) lists and RSA keys, which change from version to version, Emotet's main payload hasn't changed much, but the list of phrases used to establish a process name for its bot has been renewed. Along with new binaries, words like engine, finish, magnify, resapi, query, skip, and many more are utilized and modified. Researchers may be able to construct signatures to detect Emotet infections on machines once these lists have been secured, but signature-based detection is more challenging if the list changes. 

Abuse.ch has published a list of the new Emotet botnet's command and control servers and strongly advises network administrators to ban the linked IP addresses. Another new feature is the ability to collect extra system information from compromised workstations in addition to a list of running processes. The number of bots and associated dispersion are crucial indicators of Emotet's success in reconstructing its once-vast infrastructure.

50% of Misconfigured Containers Hit by Botnets in an Hour

 

Aqua Security announced on Monday that information gathered from container honeypots over a six-month period indicated that 50% of misconfigured Docker APIs are attacked within 56 minutes of being set up. 

According to the study, it takes the opponents' bots an average of five hours to scan a new honeypot. The quickest scan took only a few minutes, while the longest scan took 24 hours. This revelation, according to Assaf Morag, a principal data analyst with Aqua's Team Nautilus, emphasizes the need of discovering and resolving cloud misconfigurations quickly or preventing them from occurring before app deployment. 

Security professionals, according to Morag, must be aware that even the smallest misconfiguration could expose their containers and Kubernetes clusters to a cyberattack. 

“The threat landscape has morphed as malicious adversaries extend their arsenals with new and advanced techniques to avoid detection,” stated Morag. 

“Although cryptocurrency mining is still the lowest hanging fruit and thus more targeted, we have seen more attacks that involve the delivery of malware, establishing of backdoors, and data and credentials theft. Focusing on misconfigurations is important, but companies also need a more holistic approach that includes a focus on supply chain attacks.” 

The findings of this paper were incorporated into the MITRE ATT&CK Container Framework's development. Container security has been on MITRE's radar for a while, but it wasn't until later that the business started noticing enough reported activity to start analyzing the area and add it to ATT&CK, according to Adam Pennington, MITRE ATT&CK director. 

“We’ve gone from occasional anecdotes about security incidents to a number of organizations regularly detecting and talking about intrusions,” Pennington said. 

Cloud misconfigurations have become a serious risk for container users, according to Michael Cade, senior global technologist for Kasten by Veeam. 

“Misconfigurations are one of the ways that containers are uniquely exposed, basically as a default to ease development burdens. They are a likely point of ingress for container attacks, so it’s extremely important to have an effective remediation plan in place,” Cade stated.

International Law Enforcement Takes Down Emotet Malware in a Joint Operation

 

Emotet, one of the most dangerous email spam botnets in recent history, is being wiped out today from all infected devices with the help of a malware module delivered in January by law enforcement. The botnet's takedown is the result of an international law enforcement action that allowed investigators to take control of the Emotet's servers and disrupt the malware's operation. 

This specifically designed malware code forced the Emotet to self-destruct on Sunday, April 25. The code was distributed at the end of January to Emotet-infected computers by the malware's command-and-control (C2) infrastructure, which had just been seized in an international law enforcement operation.

After the takedown operation, law enforcement pushed a new configuration to active Emotet infections so that the malware would begin to use command and control servers controlled by the Bundeskriminalamt, Germany's federal police agency. Law enforcement then distributed a new Emotet module in the form of a 32-bit EmotetLoader.dll to all infected systems that automatically uninstalled the malware on Sunday.

“The EmotetLoader.dll is a 32-bit DLL responsible for removing the malware from all infected computers. This will ensure that all services related to Emotet will be deleted, the run key in the Windows registry is removed – so that no more Emotet modules are started automatically – and all running Emotet processes are terminated,” Mariya Grozdanova, a threat intelligence analyst at Redscan, stated.

Emotet was particularly nasty in that it spread mainly via malicious attachments in spam emails, and once installed, could bring in additional malware: infected machines were rented out to crooks to install things like ransomware and code that drained victims' online bank accounts. Computer security biz Digital Shadows highlighted the extent of the Emotet epidemic and said its removal is an overall win for everyone. 

Paul Robichaux, senior director of product management at IT forensics firm Quest, stated to The Register: “These kinds of large-scale, coordinated attacks and global botnets are too big for individual organizations to resolve entirely themselves, and leaving individual companies to clean them up themselves is a legitimate national security problem. However, the fact that law enforcement is on the case is no excuse to let your guard down. You still need to focus on securing your own environments.”

Emotet Botnet Operators Switching to a New Template Named ‘Red Dawn’


Emotet malware has been continually evolving to the levels of technically sophisticated malware that has a major role in the expansion of the cybercrime ecosystem. First discovered as a simple banking Trojan, Emotet’s roots date back to 2014 when it attempted to steal banking credentials from affected machines.

However, after going through multiple upgrades, since then, it has taken upon various roles- to exemplify, it has leveled up its threat game long ago to become a “loader”; it gathers data and sends it via an encrypted channel to its command and control (C2) servers, it also downloads modules to further the functionality.

The threat actors, actively involved in the rapid expansion of “Emotet” as a service, have devised a new method of attacking their targets by making them access infected documents. Until a while ago, the operators of Emotet have been using an iOS-themed document template in their botnet campaigns, the template informed victims that the document was created on iOS and that in order to view the content properly, he needs to ‘Enable Content’.

However, this is not the scenario anymore. In its newer campaigns, the notorious botnet is reported to be employing a new template, named ‘Red Dawn’ by Emotet expert, Joseph Roosen, for its red accent colors.

While displaying the message, “This document is protected”, the Red Dawn template informs the user that the preview is unavailable and in order to view the document, he is required to click on ‘Enable Content’ or ‘Enable Editing’ button.

After the user is being tricked into accessing the document via the steps he was asked to follow, Emotet malware gets installed on his system following the execution of macros. Once the system is successfully infected, Emotet malware may proceed to deliver other malware and ransomware namely Trickbot and Qbot or Conti and ProLock respectively.

“#Emotet AAR for 2020/09/02: Only a couple malspams at dayjob. It looks like JP is getting targeted heavily now by E1/E2 and E3. Seeing templates on all 3! The new regex for E1 is stupid and I bet Yuri thought that was epic, well nope, even easier to block, new regex in report. TT”, Joseph Roosen said in his related Tweet.

Over 500 SSH Servers being Breached by FritzFrog P2P Botnet


Cyberspace has seen an unprecedented rise in modified versions of peer-to peer, also known as (P2P) threats, it might have appeared that these P2P services have been vanishing, but in reality, they have emerged even stronger in newer ways. BitTorrent and eMule are still known to be in use by attackers.

A peer-to-peer (P2P) network is an IT infrastructure in which two or more computers have agreed to share resources such as storage, bandwidth and processing power with one another. Besides file sharing, it also allows access to devices like printers without going through separate server software. A P2P network is not to be confused with client-server network that users have traditionally used in networking, here, the client does not contribute resources to the network.

Researchers at Guardicore have recently discovered a sophisticated peer-to-peer (P2P) botnet called as FritzFrog that has been actively operated since January 2020, breaching SSH servers; it’s a Golang-based modular malware that executes a worm malware written in Golang, it is multi-threaded, completely volatile, and fileless and leaves no trace on the infected system’s disk.

It has a decentralized infrastructure which distributes control among all its nodes. The network uses AES for symmetric encryption and the Diffie-Hellman protocol for key exchange in order to carry out P2P communication via an encrypted channel.

So far, more than 20 malware samples have been discovered by the researchers as FritzFrog attempted to brute force over 500 SSH servers belonging to educational institutions, governmental institutions, telecom organizations, banks, and medical centers worldwide. The campaign also targeted some well known high-education institutions in the United States and Europe, along with a railway firm.

Botnets are being leveraged by attackers for DDoS attacks and other malicious activities, as per the recent attack trend. Earlier in June this year, the Monzi malware was seen exploiting IoT devices, mainly DVRs and routers. Threat actors brought together various malware families namely Mirai, Gafgyt and IoT Reaper, to carry out a botnet capable of DDoS attacks, command or payload execution or data exfiltration.

“FritzFrog’s binary is an advanced piece of malware written in Golang. It operates completely in-memory; each node running the malware stores in its memory the whole database of targets and peers,” according to Guardicore’s report.

“FritzFrog takes advantage of the fact that many network security solutions enforce traffic only by the port and protocol. To overcome this stealth technique, process-based segmentation rules can easily prevent such threats.”

“Weak passwords are the immediate enabler of FritzFrog’s attacks. We recommend choosing strong passwords and using public key authentication, which is much safer. In addition, it is crucial to remove FritzFrog’s public key from the authorized_keys file, preventing the attackers from accessing the machine. Routers and IoT devices often expose SSH and are thus vulnerable to FritzFrog; consider changing their SSH port or completely disabling SSH access to them if the service is not in use.” The report further read.

Prometei: A Cryptomining Botnet that Attacks Microsoft's Vulnerabilities


An unknown Botnet called "Prometei" is attacking windows and Microsoft devices (vulnerable) using brute force SMb exploits. According to Cisco Talos, these SMB vulnerabilities help in mining cryptocurrency. The botnet has affected around a thousand devices. It came in March; however, according to experts at Cisco Talos, the campaign could only generate a small amount of $5000 in four months of its activities. The botnet was working since the beginning of March and took a blow on 8th June. However, the botnet kept working on its mining operations to steal credentials. According to experts, the botnet is working for somebody based in Europe, a single developer.


"Despite their activities being visible in logs, some botnets successfully fly under detection teams' radar, possibly due to their small size or constant development on the adversary's part. Prometei is just one of these types of networks that focuses on Monero mining. It has been successful in keeping its computing power constant over the three months we've been tracking it," says Cisco Talo's report.
Vanja Svajcer, a cybersecurity expert, says that earning $1250 monthly is more than average for a European. Therefore, the developer would 've made a fair profit from the botnet. Besides crypto mining, it can also steal private credentials and escape without getting traced.

About SMB attack 

The hacker exploits the Windows Server Message Block protocol using a vulnerability. After this, the hackers retrieve passwords from Mimikatz, which is an open-source app for credential authentication. To spread itself in SMB protocol, the hackers use the RdpcIip.exe spreader module. This spreader tries to authenticate SMB operation using retrieved credentials or a temporary guest profile, which doesn't require any password. If the spreader can infiltrate, it uses a Windows app to launch the botnet remotely. But if the attack fails, the hackers can use other versions of vulnerabilities to start botnet.

To protect yourself, Cisco Talos says, "defenders need to be constantly vigilant and monitor systems' behavior within their network. Attackers are like water — they will attempt to find the smallest crack to seep in. While organizations need to be focused on protecting their most valuable assets, they should not ignore threats that are not particularly targeted toward their infrastructure."

LeeHozer and Moobot Have The Same Attack Maneuvers?


Sharing has become a thing with cyber-criminals and their malware mechanisms. Reportedly, LeetHozer botnet was found to have similar attack tactics as that of the Mootbot malware family. Researchers have reasons to think that the party that created the Moobot also could be the ones who created the LeetHozer.

Per researchers, the LeetHozer botnet has been counting on other kinds of malware for a little bit of sharing here and there. Per sources, it has in the past used the loader and reporter system that the Mirai uses.

Apparently, despite using the same mechanisms as Mirai the LeetHoxer threat was a little different. According to researchers, other Mirai variations too were altered including the encryption procedure, the bot program, and the command and control protocol. The unique "string and downloader" too were revealed to be of the same kind as Mirai.

Per reports, the botnet was noticed when it was found to be manipulating a vulnerability in the “telenet service” of a device. It made use of the default password to get access to the device. Once the device got infected the LeetHozer sent the information of the device to its reporter mechanism which then got to the command and control server and then finally the instructions for the Denial-of-Service attack were received.

The history of various attacks has it that Moobot has been a part of quite a lot of attacks ever since it first surfaced last year. According to researchers, several threat actors have made use of it to exploit zero-day vulnerabilities. It was discovered by the researchers while it was manipulating a zero-day vulnerability in fiber routers, reports mention. It hence is needless to say that one of the major attack tactics of the Moobot is exploiting any zero-day flaw it could get it claws into.

There are numerous ways in which an organization can create a barricade against any such attacks. The cyber and technological security personnel could design a response plan and a contingency plan especially against DDoS attacks, the systems should be backed up at all times, and configuration could be done in a way that as soon as the network is attacked the back-up kicks in. Also, researchers suggest that Artificial Intelligence could prove to be a very lucrative solution for such problems.

Three Botnets Abuse Zero-Day Vulnerabilities in LILIN's DVRs!


Not of late, LILIN recorders were found to be vulnerable. Reportedly, botnet operators were behind the zero-day vulnerabilities that were exploited in the Digital Video Recorders (DVRs ) that the vendor is well known for.

Sources mention that the exploitation of the zero-day vulnerabilities had been a continuous thing for almost half a year and the vendor was unaware. Nevertheless, they rolled out a patch in February 2020.

Digital Video Recorders are electronic devices that collect video feeds from local CCTV/IP cameras systems and store them on different mass storage devices like SD cards, USB flash drives, disk drives, etc.

DVRs are a huge deal today given they are a major element for the security cameras that are used almost everywhere in these times.

With CCTV cameras raging, attacks especially designed for them have also risen equally. Malware botnets and other hacker operations have been targeting these widely used DVRs for quite some time now.

Per sources, the non-revised and out of date firmware stands to be the reason for these devices being hacked. Especially, the DVRs with default credentials are exploited to kick off DDoS and other IoT attacks.
Sources mention that security researchers found LILIN’s DVRs too were being exploited for almost half a year, since August last year by three botnets.


The vulnerability in the “NTPUpdate”, sources mention, allows attackers to inject and control the system’s commands. Via one of the ‘hardcoded credentials’ (root/icatch99 & report/8Jg0SR8K50) the attacker stands a chance to retrieve and alter a DVR’s config file, and later control commands on the device after the File Transfer Protocol (FTP) server configuration is regularly matched.

Per sources, the first botnet behind the zero-day vulnerability was the “Chalubo botnet” with a motive of exploiting the NTPUdate of the LILIN DVRs. The other two were employed by the “FBot botnet”

Reportedly, a couple of weeks after the previous attacks of the FBot, the Moobot botnet also tried its luck and succeeded on the second zero-day vulnerability.

There is no knowing as to what the exact motive was behind hacking the LILIN DVRs. Nevertheless, there has been a history of DDoS attacks, re-routing traffic, and proxy networks.

As it happens there are, per sources, over 5,000 LILIN DVRs that exist today thus making it quite a hefty task to update all of them immediately. But it’s a relief to know that the first step has been taken. There’s not much to worry about now given LILIN has released a firmware update along with solutions for mitigation.

Microsoft shuts down World's Largest Botnet Army


According to Microsoft, the company was part of a team that took down the global network of zombie bots. Necurs is one of the largest botnets globally and is also responsible for attacking more than 9 million computers. It is infamous for multiple criminal cyberattacks that include sending phishing emails like fake pharmaceuticals e-mail and stealing personal user data. The hackers use Botnets for taking over remote access of internet-connected systems to install malware and dangerous software. The hackers then use the installed malicious software to steal personal user data like user activity on the computer, send spams and fake e-mails, modify or delete user information without the knowledge of the owner.


The taking down of the Necurs happened after 8 years of consistent hard work and patience along with co-ordinated planning with 35 counties across the world, says Tom Burt, VP of customer security and trust, Microsoft. According to Tom, now that the botnet network is down, hackers will no longer be able to execute cyberattacks with the help of the botnet network.

About Botnet

Botnets are systems of the web-connected computers that run on self-automated commands. Hackers use this network of systems to send malware (malicious software) that allows them remote access to a computer. If the malware is installed or starts affecting the computer, hackers steal personal user information or use the infected device as a host to launch more cyberattacks by sending spams and malware. When the device is infected through malware, it's called Zombie.

Origin of Botnet Network

The news of the 1st Necurs attack appeared in 2012. According to experts, Necurs is said to have affected more than 9 million computers. Necurs used domain generation algorithms to grow its network. It turned arbitrary domain names into websites and used them to send spams or malware to the attacked computers. Fortunately, Microsoft and the team deciphered the algorithm pattern and predicted the next domain name that Necurs would have used to launch another cyberattack, and prevented the attack from happening.

Signs your computer might be affected

  • Systems run slow and programs load slowly 
  • Computer crashes frequently 
  • Suspicious filling up of storage 
  • Your account sends spam emails to your contacts

Hacker who was offering Cybercrime-as-a-service detained in Novokuznetsk



Employees of the Ministry of Internal Affairs of Russia with the assistance of experts of Group-IB, an international company specializing in the prevention of cyber attacks, detained a hacker in Russian city Novokuznetsk who hacked computers around the world.

The detainee offered Cybercrime-as-a-service services to cyber criminals.  He created and maintained admin panels for managing malware and botnets. 
 
According to the local report, he infected more than 50 thousands computers across the world.  He managed to steal usernames and passwords from browsers, mail clients of the infected computers.  He also reportedly stole financial information such as bank card details.

The investigation began in the spring of 2018, when the hacker infected around 1000 of computers with malicious software Formgrabber.

"He administered the botnet, which counted several thousand infected computers of Russian and foreign users,” the press service of the Ministry of Internal Affairs reported.

It turned out that the hacker is only 26 years old, since 15 he has earned money by creating websites for computer games, but then he decided to learn the profession of a hacker.  More recently, he was testing malware targeting Android platform.

He has already been charged under the article "Creation and distribution of malicious computer programs". He completely admitted his guilt.

Your Internet Connection is most likely “hacked”; Experts say so


In case you're utilizing a Wi-Fi connection in your home, you would be very astonished to realize that your web connection is most likely 'hacked', but t real question is by whom, and what for...?

Saravanan K, a Bengaluru-based specialist working on security answers for organizations probably knows best as per him, a great many people who aren't well aware of the dangers lurking deep in the technical world don't change the default equipment and the default settings, which in itself is a serious issue.

Its biggest example being the surveillance cameras where people will in general leave the usernames and passwords at the manufacturer setting, and after that any other person who cognizes the IP address can sign into them over the Web. The equivalent is frequently valid with Wi-Fi routers, as there are numerous individuals who do not comprehend them by any means.

In a study, by the Chinese cyber security analysts Netlab 360 demonstrated that India has indeed the most home routers tainted by BCMPUPnP_Hunter. This malware has made a botnet with more than 100, 00 routers and uses it to send incalculable spam messages. China and the USA both have a high number of tainted devices, yet the number in India is evidently just about a multiple times higher.

 “They're basically using your home as a base of operations to attack other people. So they don't want to take down your computer nor do anything else that will get them noticed, they want you to stay online an active," explains Saravanan.

"This is actually a big problem for the home users.” Adding further he says, “What's happening is that your Internet bandwidth is being consumed, so your streaming might seem slow, or your data limit might be hit sooner than expected, costing you real money, and apart from that, the other downside is that attacks like credential stuffing are being powered by your network, and that's going to hurt other consumers like yourself."

The darker the colour, the more number of infected devices.

But there's only much that an average user can do to remain safe and the only possible path through which they can secure themselves as pointed out via a research from IBM is by purchasing new hardware.

Anyway it's as yet imperative to realize that these sorts of botnets are developing and spreading fast, and will influence the other gadgets as well, where the effect can be significantly more dangerous. The progressions caused make the attacks by these botnets a lot harder to distinguish by users, and subsequently prompting the expansion in these issues after some time.

Upgrade your SOHO routers firmware to the latest version


A recent study has uncovered that a huge number of Small Office / Home Office (SOHO) routers, who neglect basic security practices, were recently targeted by attackers.


The study conducted by Incapsula security team was published on its blog by researchers Ofer Gayer, Ronen Atias, Igal Zeifman.  

It has urged router owners to disable all remote access to their router management interfaces. In order to verify that their own router is not open to remote access, they can use YouGetSignal to scan for the following ports: SSH (22), Telnet (23) and HTTP/HTTPS (80/443).

Along with that, it has recommended all router owners to change the default login credentials, if they haven’t done so already.

And those whose routers are already compromised, they can upgrade their routers’ firmware to the latest version provided by the manufacturer.

It is said that the flaw was the result of negligent, with ISPs, vendors, and users sharing a long tradition of disregarding basic security practices. As a result hundreds of thousands routers likely to be controlled by hacker which are used to attack the Internet ecosystem and interconnected networks.

The study revealed that major companies involved in the issue.

The study’s main target is to share attack details in an attempt to raise awareness about the dangers posed by under-secured, connected devices.

Although the study has been published, many botnet devices are still attacking the users and other websites.

According to the study, the researchers first identified these attacks on December 30, 2014 and have been mitigating them ever since. In the last 30 days, they saw that the number of attacking IPs had been increasing.

The rapid growth compelled the Incapsula security team to further investigate the case. The team revealed that this wave of attacks is a part of a much larger DDoS assault targeting hundreds of other domains outside of the Incapsula network, and includes other attack vectors and  network layer barrages.

After the research, Incapsula contacted the vendor of the routers and the ISPs whose routers and networks, it found to be most open to abuse.

After inspecting a sample of 13,000 malware files, they found out that on average, each compromised router held four variants of MrBlack malware, as well as additional malware files, including Dofloo and Mayday, which are also used for DDoS attacks.

27 year old Female hacker Arrested by ITCU

Recently, a 27 year old Female hacker was arrested by the Integrated Techological Crime Unit (ITCU) from her residence in Saint-Alphonse-de-Rodriguez. The ITCU believes that this individual is the origin of a botnet.

The female was using a Remote Administration Tool that would remotely takeover the computers infected with the botnet virus and spy on their using the webcam. She also communicated with some of her victims through their speakers.

The hacker also posted a video on youtube of herself hacking into others computers and trying to scare them.

Users have been requested by many to take necessary precautions so that they don't become victim of such attacks.

International operation mounted to counter Beebone Botnet

A multinational task-force comprising of European Cybercrime Centre (EC3) and the Joint Cybercrime Action Taskforce (J-CAT), the FBI and led by Dutch National High Tech Crime Unit was recently set up to target the Beebone (AAEH) botnet, a downloader virus that cripples a computers defenses by downloading various malwares on a PC.

Private players Intel Security, Kaspersky and Shadowserver were also present to consult on destroying the polymorphic downloader that according to sources, has affected 12000 computers till date.

The operation 'sinkholed' the botnet by recognizing the domain names and addresses of the affected parties and then rerouting traffic.

Emergency teams around the world have been put into motion to get into touch with the victims of the botnet. The number of affected parties is less in this case, but the botnet has been deemed to be very sophisticated.

The operation was successfully carried out after which Europol’s Deputy Director of Operations, Wil van Gemert, said "This successful operation shows the importance of international law enforcement working together with private industry to fight the global threat of cybercrime."

"We will continue our efforts to take down botnets and disrupt the core infrastructures used by cybercriminals to carry out a variety of crimes. Together with the EU Member States and partners around the globe, our aim is to protect people worldwide against these criminal activities."

One of the largest Android Botnet 'MisoSMS' steals messages

Security researchers from FireEye have uncovered one of the largest Android botnet which they dubbed as "MisoSMS".  The botnet is said to have been used in at least 64 spyware campaigns.

According to the report, the malware disguised as an "Android settings" application used for adminstrative tasks.

 The threat is designed to steal messages from victims and emails the messages to a Command and control(C&C) server located in china.

 the most of the infected devices are from Korea.  The cybercriminals behind this botnet logged into the server from Korea, China and few other locations in order to read the stolen messages.

FireEye said they are collaborating with the Koran law enforcement and Chinese webmail vendor in a effort to disrupt this botnet.