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FDA Issues Cybersecurity Alert on Medtronic Insulin Pumps

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a warning on Tuesday regarding the vulnerability of some insulin pump devices made by Medtronic. The flaw makes the devices vulnerable to cyberattacks while presenting a possibility for hackers to interfere with insulin delivery by gaining access to the device.

The FDA, a U.S. government organization, has issued an advisory regarding the MiniMed 600 Series Insulin Pump System from Medtronic, which includes the MiniMed 630G and MiniMed 670G devices.

The Department of Health and Human Services safeguards the public's health by ensuring the efficacy, security, and safety of pharmaceuticals for use in humans and animals, medical devices, and vaccinations. The agency is in charge of regulating tobacco products as well as the safety and security of our country's food supply, cosmetics, nutritional supplements, and devices that emit electronic radiation.

The FDA pointed out that many parts, including the insulin pump, constant glucose monitoring (CGM) transmitter, blood glucose meter, and CareLink USB device, connect wirelessly. A technical malfunction could make it possible for someone to break in and trigger the pump to administer the patient with either too much or too little insulin.

The insulin pumps are offered by Medtronic's diabetes division, which generated $2.41 billion in sales in 2021, or 8% of the business's overall revenue.

In the aftermath of the security incident, Medtronic cautioned users about the dangers and offered suggestions, such as advising them to permanently disable the 'Remote Bolus' function on the pump, refrain from disclosing the serial number of the device to unauthorized individuals, and avoid connecting or linking devices in public.

The business warned that patients should never accept remote connection requests and other remote activities unless patients or support persons initiated them and should always detach the USB device from their laptop while it is not being used to download pump data.

Although medical equipment is frequently connected to the internet, hospital networks, and other devices, the FDA warned that these same characteristics may pose cybersecurity threats.

According to the FDA advisory, "Medical devices, like other computer systems, might be subject to security breaches, possibly affecting the device's safety and effectiveness."

The MiniMed 508 and Paradigm insulin pumps have security flaws that Medtronic is unable to fully fix with software updates or patches. The FDA said that it was working with Medtronic to identify, discuss, and anticipate the negative consequences of this risk.


Hackers are Actively Targeting Linux-Based Devices

Ransomware attacks against Linux have accelerated as cybercriminals try to increase their options and take advantage of an operating system that is sometimes neglected when organizations think about security. 

According to Trend Micro, hackers prefer using ransomware-as-a-service (RaaS) techniques because they enable quicker deployment and higher rewards. Additionally, they increasingly focused their attacks on Linux-based computers and employed relatively new ransomware families in high-profile strikes. Operators of ransomware also used both cutting-edge and time-tested strategies to attack cloud environments.

Linux powers significant enterprise IT infrastructure, including servers, making it a target for ransomware gangs. This is especially true when cybersecurity teams may decide to concentrate on protecting Windows networks against cybercrime due to a believed lack of threat to Linux systems compared to Windows.

For instance, LockBit, one of the most widespread and effective ransomware operations in recent memory, now provides the choice of a Linux-based variant that is made to target Linux systems and has been used to carry out assaults in the field.

Hackers are regularly extending the scope of their exploits by focusing on Linux, one of the most potent operating systems utilized in cloud platforms and servers around the world, in addition to upping the ante by utilizing MaaS methods in their attacks.

The RaaS architecture makes it simpler and quicker for cyber criminals to deploy ransomware attacks than traditional ransomware models, even those with limited technical knowledge. According to SPN data, three ransomware families—the infamous LockBit, Conti, and BlackCat families—dominated the RaaS space in terms of detections. BlackCat is a family of ransomware that was developed in the Rust programming language at the end of 2021.

Attackers using ransomware are motivated by money and would jump at new possibilities if they believe they can increase their earnings; it would seem that encrypting Linux systems and demanding payment for the key to open servers and files are becoming more and more common.

According to researchers, as ransomware perpetrators strive to maximize their profits, this strategy will only grow in popularity.

It's not only ransomware entities that are focusing more on Linux, according to Trend Micro, but there has also been a 145% increase in Linux-based cryptocurrency-mining malware attacks, wherein online criminals covertly use the processing power of infected computers and servers to mine for cryptocurrency for their own gain.

Apple Offers iOS Update to Fix Vulnerabilities

Apple has patched a vulnerability that was potentially used by hackers in its iOS 12 upgrade for older iPhone and iPad models. The vulnerability was discovered by an anonymous researcher, who has received acknowledgment.

The flaw, identified as CVE-2022-32893 (CVSS score: 8.8), affects WebKit and is an out-of-bounds write problem that could result in arbitrary code execution when processing maliciously created web content, according to a document released by the firm on Wednesday.

A security vulnerability found in the platform affects users of Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, and Microsoft Edge as well because WebKit powers Safari and every other third-party browser accessible for iOS and iPadOS.

The security patch fixes a Safari vulnerability that might have allowed unauthorized access for users to parse maliciously created web content and execute arbitrary code. With enhanced bounds checking, the developers appear to have found a solution. Apple stated that they are already aware of a report that claims the problem may have been intentionally exploited.

Several older Apple devices, including the iPhone 5S, iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, iPad Air, iPad Mini 2, iPad Mini 3, and iPod Touch, are compatible with the 275 MB update published to fix the vulnerability.

12.5.6, build 16H71, is the most recent version of the software. It appears to close the security flaw that the business recently fixed in the iOS 15.6.1 release, listed as CVE-2022-32893. 

After fixing two bugs in iOS 15.6.1, iPadOS 15.6.1, macOS 12.5.1, and Safari 15.6.1 as part of updates released on August 18, 2022, the iPhone manufacturer has released a new round of patches. 

The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), which discovered the significant bug and gave it a CVSS rating of 8.8, also identified it and published a warning about it last month.

Although specifics about the assaults' nature are unknown, Apple confirmed in a boilerplate statement that it was aware that this problem may have been actively exploited.

On September 7, Apple will also unveil the iPhone 14 series and iOS 16. Unfortunately, iOS 16 will not be made available to users of iPhone 8. Furthermore, older iOS device owners are urged to update as soon as possible to reduce security risks.

Kaspersky VPN Secure Connection Vulnerability Discovered

Kaspersky's VPN Secure Connection for Microsoft Windows has a local privilege-escalation (LPE) vulnerability that could allow an already-authenticated hacker to access administrative privileges and potentially seize total control of a victim's computer.

Researchers disagree over the bug's CVSS score, which is tracked as CVE-2022-27535. The bug has a high-severity CVSS score of 7.8 out of 10 as per a Synopsys alert published, but Kaspersky scores it as moderate with a 5.0 CVSS level.

In either case, it is present in the Support Tools section of the app and would enable root access to Server, the highest level possible in the Windows environment, allowing an authenticated hacker to delete any file at will from the system.

The Kaspersky team has fixed a flaw in the Kaspersky VPN Secure Connection that was exploited by an authorized hacker to trigger arbitrary file deletion on the host. It might result in device malfunction or the deletion of crucial system files necessary for proper system operation. 

An attacker needed to create a specific file and persuade customers to utilize the 'Delete all service data and reports' or 'Save report on your computer' product capabilities in order to carry out this attack.

Users should upgrade to version 21.6 or later to patch their systems because Kaspersky has solved the problem.


PrestaShop Sites Hit by Severe Security Flaw

 


Hackers are using a blend of known and undiscovered security flaws to insert malicious software into e-commerce websites running the PrestaShop platform, according to an urgent advisory from PrestaShop. There are currently 300,000 stores using PrestaShop, which is available in 60 different languages.

Operation objective:

Hackers exploit businesses that are utilizing out-of-date software or modules, susceptible third-party modules, or a vulnerability that has not yet been identified. The store must be vulnerable to SQL injection attacks for the attack to succeed. PrestaShop versions 1.6.0.10 and later and versions 1.7.8.2 and after running modules susceptible to SQL injection are also affected by the vulnerability.

The repeating method is stated in the PrestaShop security bulletin as follows:
  • A POST request is made by the hacker to a vulnerability endpoint to SQL injection.
  • The hacker sends a GET request to the homepage without any parameters after around a second.
  • This triggers the creation of a PHP file with the name blm.php at the root of the shop's directory.
  • The attacker now sends a GET request to the newly constructed file, blm.php, enabling them to carry out any command.
The hackers likely exploited this web shell to insert a scam payment form on the store's checkout page and steal payment card information from customers. To keep the site owner from learning that they had been compromised, the remote threat actors erased their trails after the attack.

Security measures 

Ensure that the site is updated to the most recent version, as well as all of its modules. Compromise site managers may discover entries in the web server's access logs for clues that they were compromised if the hackers weren't careful with the cleanup of evidence.

The addition of malicious software to files through file modifications and the activation of the MySQL Smarty cache storage, which is a component of the attack chain, are additional indications of compromise.

Because of the exploit's intricacy, there are various techniques to use it, and hackers might also try to cover their traces. To ensure that no file has been edited or malicious software has been installed, think about hiring a professional to conduct a thorough audit of the website.