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Showing posts with label Outlook. Show all posts

Microsoft Now Permits IT Administrators to Evaluate and Deactivate Inactive Azure AD users

 

Azure Active Directory has received a handful of security updates from Microsoft. In preview, the business has unveiled a new access reviews tool that allows enterprises to delete inactive user accounts which may pose a security concern. Users who created the new Azure AD tenant after October 2019 received security defaults, however, customers who built Azure AD tenants before October 2019 did not receive security defaults. 

According to Microsoft, the Azure AD security defaults are utilized by around 30 million companies today, and the defaults will be rolled out to many more organizations, resulting in the settings protecting 60 million more accounts. IT admins could now terminate Azure AD accounts that haven't signed in for a certain number of days. 

The Azure Active Directory Identity Governance service now includes the new access review feature. It's useful for companies who don't want contractors or former employees to have access to sensitive data. Azure Active Directory (Azure AD) is a Microsoft cloud service that manages identification and authentication for on-premise and cloud applications. In Windows 2000, it was the advancement of Active Directory Domain Services. 

"The term "sign-in activity" refers to both interactive and non-interactive sign-in activities. Stale accounts may be automatically removed during the screening process. As a result, your company's security posture increases," Microsoft explained. 

According to Alex Weinert, Microsoft's director of identity security, the defaults were implemented for new tenants to ensure that they had "minimum security hygiene," including multi-factor authentication (MFA) and contemporary authentication, independent of the license. He points out that the 30 million firms which have security defaults in place are significantly less vulnerable to intrusions.

This month, Microsoft will send an email to all global admins of qualified Azure AD tenants informing them of security settings. These administrators will receive an Outlook notification from Microsoft in late June, instructing them to "activate security defaults" and warning of "security defaults will be enforced automatically for respective businesses in 14 days." All users in a tenant will be required to register for MFA using the Microsoft Authenticator app after it has been activated. A phone number is also required of global administrators.

Emotet : The Infamous Botnet Has Returned

 

Kaspersky researchers were able to retrieve and analyze 10 out of 16 modules, with most having been used by Emotet in the past in one form or another. Kaspersky Lab was created in 1997 as multinational cybersecurity and digital privacy organization. Kaspersky's deep risk intelligence and security expertise are continually evolving into new security solutions and services to safeguard enterprises, vital infrastructure, governments, and consumers all around the world. 

Emotet was discovered in the wild for the first time in 2014. Its major purpose back then was to steal user's financial credentials. Since then, it has gone through several modifications, began transmitting other viruses, and eventually evolved into a strong botnet. Emotet is a type of malware classified as banking Trojans. Malspam, or spam emails with malware, is the most common way for it to propagate. To persuade users, these communications frequently contain familiar branding, imitating the email structure of well-known and trustworthy companies such as PayPal or DHL. 

As per Kaspersky telemetry, the number of victims increased from 2,843 in February 2022 to 9,086 in March 2022, indicating the attackers targeted more than three times the number of users. As a result, the number of threats detected by Kaspersky solutions has increased, from 16,897 in February 2022 to 48,597 in March 2022. 

A typical Emotet infection starts with spam e-mails containing malicious macros in Microsoft Office attachments. The actor can use this macro to launch a malicious PowerShell command which will drop and start a module loader, which will then talk with a command and control server to download and start modules. In the percent Windows percent SysWOW64 or percent User percent AppDataLocal directory, Emotet creates a subfolder with a random name and replicates itself under a completely random name and extension. The exported Control RunDLL method is used to launch the Emotet DLL's primary activity. These modules can be used to carry out a range of actions on the infected computer. Kaspersky researchers were able to extract and evaluate 10 of the 16 modules, the majority of which had previously been utilized by Emotet. 

Researchers now state that the Emotet can download 16 modules judging by the recent Emotet protocol and C2 answers. They were able to recover ten of them (including two separate copies of the Spam module), which were utilized by Emotet to steal credentials, passwords, accounts, and e-mail addresses, as well as spam. We present a brief examination of these modules and also statistics on current Emotet attacks in this post. 

To gather the account details of various email clients, the current version of Emotet can create automated spam campaigns which are further spread down the network from infected devices, retrieving emails and email addresses from Thunderbird and Outlook apps and accumulating passwords from popular web browsers like Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome, Safari, and Opera. 

Emotet infects computers in businesses and homes all around the world. As per our telemetry, Emotet most frequently targeted users from the following countries in Q1 2022: Italy (10.04%), Russia (9.87%), Japan (8.55%), Mexico (8.36%), Brazil (6.88%), Indonesia (4.92%), India (3.21%), Vietnam (2.70%), China (2.62), Germany (2.19%) and Malaysia (2.13%). 

The present set of components is capable of a wide range of malicious activities, including stealing e-mails, passwords, and login data from a variety of sources, as well as spamming. Except for the Thunderbird components, Emotet has utilized all of these modules in some form or another before. However, there are still a few modules that we haven't been able to get our hands-on.

99 Iranian websites used for hacking were seized by Microsoft

                    




According to a report by Associated Press, Microsoft has seized 99 Iranian websites that were supposedly stealing information and launching cyber attacks. The report also said that it had been tracking the group of hackers since 2013.

The hackers were targeting people in the middle east to steal sensitive information by using the malicious websites that were disguised as Microsoft, Linkedin, Outlook and Windows products. Microsoft confirmed in a court filing that this group was stealing information about reporters, activists, political people including “ protesting oppressive regimes”.

The hackers are from Iran but the Tehran government has denied any hacking activity from their end. In the past also Iran government has denied any hacking attempts from their end.

Allison Wikoff, a security researcher at Atlanta-based SecureWorks told Associated Press that according to her observation it is one of the “more active Iranian threat groups”. She further added that Microsoft analyze fake domains through analyzing traffics to protect against fake domains and the practice is popularly called as “sinkholing”.In the past also, Microsoft has used “sinkholing” to seize fake domains made by Russian hackers back in 2016.







Phishing Attacks on Microsoft and Outlook; By Way of Microsoft’s Azure Blob Storage




Two major phishing campaigns have been discovered by the researchers which uses Microsoft’s Azure blob to steal details from Outlook and Microsoft accounts.


Both the campaigns employ real-looking landing pages which make use of SSL certificates and the windows.net domain to seem authentic.

The first phishing email goes around asking the receivers to log into their office 365 account to update the information.

The emails happened to have “Action Required: (email address) information is outdated-Re-validate now!!” in their subject boxes.

The moment a user clicks on the link provided in the mail, they will be directed to a landing page which fake-acts as the organization’s Outlook Web App.

This landing page is what does the main task of stealing the credentials from the user.

The second one works on stealing users’ Microsoft account details and credentials.

The process to lure in the user starts from Facebook’s workplace service and ends up taking the user to a Microsoft’s landing page.

This could either be s single-sign-on approach or a mixed up campaign for luring victims in.

The Microsoft account the users are brought to, is fairly legit looking as it uses the same form and the same background for that matter.

Both the landing pages make use of Azure Blog Storage to make them look convincing and as far as possible, legitimate.

All Microsoft Azure does is that is adds legitimacy to the landing pages used by the phishing-cons to target the Microsoft services.

The Azure Blob storage URLs use the windows.net domain making the landings look fairly legitimate.

One of the phishing links which is not in use anymore had the URL-  https://1drive6e1lj8tcmteh5m.z6.web.core.windows.net/ and the domain name seemed to do the trick.

Also, every URL on Azure Blob Storage happens to be using a wildcard SSL certificate from Microsoft, making every landing page get a “lock symbol”.

This would exhibit a Microsoft certificate every time a user would try to click on the certificate to check who signed, making the entire sham all the more believable.

To steer clear of such phishing attack one thing need to be kept in mind that the original login forms from Outlook and Microsoft could indubitably have outlook.com, live.com, and Microsoft.com as their domain names.