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Vulnerability in OCI Could Have Put the Data of Customers Exposed to the Attacker

A vulnerability in OCI, AttachMe allowed attackers acquire unauthorized access to customers’ cloud storage volumes.

 

A vulnerability called 'AttatchMe', discovered by a Wiz engineer could have allowed the attackers to access and steal the OCI storage volumes of any user without their permission. 

During an Oracle cloud infrastructure examination in June, Wiz engineers disclosed a cloud isolation security flaw in Oracle Cloud Infrastructure. They found that connecting a disk to a VM in another account can be done without any permissions, which immediately made them realize it could become a path for cyberattacks for threat actors. 

Elad Gabay, the security researcher at Wiz made a public statement regarding the vulnerability on September 20. He mentioned the possible severe outcomes of the exploitation of the vulnerability saying this could have led to “severe sensitive data leakage” for all OCI customers and could even be exploited to gain code execution remotely. 

To exploit this vulnerability, attackers need unique identifiers and the oracle cloud infrastructure's environment ID (OCID) of the victim, which can be obtained either through searching on the web or through low-privileged user permission to get the volume OCID from the victim's environment. 

The vulnerability 'AttachMe' is a critical cloud isolation vulnerability, which affects a specific cloud service. The vulnerability affects user data/files by allowing malicious actors to execute severe threats including removing sensitive data from your volume, searching for cleartext secrets to move toward the victim's environment, and making the volume difficult to access, in addition to partitioning the disk that contains the operating system folder. 

The guidelines of OCI state that volumes are a “virtual disk” that allows enough space for computer instances. They are available in the two following varieties in OCI: 

1. Block volume: it is detachable storage, allowing you to expand the storage capacity if needed. 

2. Boot volume: it is a detachable boot volume device containing the image used to boot a system such as operating systems, and supporting systems. 

As soon as Oracle's partner and customer Wiz announced the vulnerability, Oracle took immediate measures to patch the vulnerability while thanking wiz for disclosing the security flaw and helping them in resolving it in the last update advisory of receiving the patch for the vulnerability.
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